Dissolved oxygen, canoes and barbel – a few thoughts

The catches of barbel from Wyebank last week and early this week were notable and coincided with rapidly rising water temperatures and high turbulence flowing over the riffle into the bottom pool where barbel congregate. Within the space of this scorching hot and bright week these good flows of well oxygenated water have dropped rapidly and the barbel have become very hard to catch. I have noticed from feedback that the most spectacular catches were made on weekends coinciding with the high numbers of canoes. One cannot underestimate the number of canoes, which some Saturdays have been enormous.

I wonder whether there is a correlation between barbel catches and canoe paddling. Notably fishermen have commented that the canoes have made little difference to fishing. If there is a correlation what then may be the cause? The act of paddling is breaking up the water and helping oxygen to dissolve rather than escape more rapidly to the air, thus giving a significant boost to barbel welfare. The fact that barbel congregate in these faster flowing places is well attested and it is reasonably clear by inference that they seek out better oxygenated water, where they will feed more readily. So canoes may be a benefit to coarse fish species in the riverWye, particularly as the signs are that barbelmay have  now adapted to the presence of canoes in the river environment of the Wye.

This entry was posted on July 12, 2013 at 7:38 pm and is filed under Catch reports, Coarse Fishing, Conservation, Fishery Management. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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